A List of Substances

Below is a list of substances which, according to the Poison Information Centre's statistics, cause frequent inquiries or are the most common cause of poisonings in humans. The substances are listed in alphabetical order. You can also use the search bar.

In this list, information on the toxicity of a substance refers primarily to small children. 

Most pharmaceuticals are listed according to the active ingredient as well as the different trade names.

This list is limited to the substances that are most often the subject of inquiry. It does not offer extensive coverage of all substances. If you cannot find a substance in the list, please contact the Poison Information Centre to confirm its toxicity.​​

Search list for:
  • Acetone

    If a child has had a gulp or two, give him/her something to drink to dilute the acetone. If the child has ingested a larger amount of acetone or develops symptoms such as drowsiness, seek medical assistance.​

  • Acetylsalicylic acid

    Keywords: Aspirin®, Disperin®, Primaspan®, Finrexin®

    A couple of 500mg pills for adults can cause severe poisoning in small children. Always contact the Poison Information Centre to confirm toxicity.

  • Adhesives (containing solvents)

    Adhesives that contain solvents may be toxic if inhaled or ingested in large amounts. Biting on a tube of glue does not pose a threat to a child.​

  • Aluminium foil

    A single dose is considered harmless. Does not require treatment.​

  • Ant traps

    Ant traps contain only small amounts of toxic ingredients. Does not require treatment.

  • Antibiotics

    Keywords: Amorion®, Amoxin®, Kefalex®, Kefexin®, Zithromax®, V-pen®

    Taking a few pills or gulps of any antibiotic intended for children is not considered harmful. However, ingestion may cause mild gastrointestinal symptoms such as diarrhoea, which can be treated at home. If large amounts of antibiotics have been ingested, contact the Poison Information Centre.

  • Artificial sweeteners

    Keywords: xylitol, sorbitol, mannitol, stevia, aspartame

    A single dose is considered harmless. Does not require treatment.​

    In large amounts, sweeteners may cause temporary gastrointestinal symptoms

  • Ash

    ​A single dose is considered harmless.

  • Bafucin®

    Ingesting a single dose of less than 25 tablets does not usually cause signs or symptoms of poisoning. However, Bafucin® tablets contain sorbitol, which may cause gastrointestinal symptoms in large doses. The gastrointestinal symptoms can be treated at home.

  • Batteries

    Batteries may cause severe chemical burns.

    Contact the Poison Information Centre to confirm toxicity

  • Bepanthen®

    Bepanthen® creams contain dexpanthenol, which is converted to vitamin B when applied to the skin. A single dose of dexpanthenol is not toxic. In large amounts, creams may cause gastrointestinal symptoms. However, these do not require treatment.

  • Blu-Tack

    A single dose is considered harmless. Does not require treatment.​

  • Button cell batteries

    Whenever a child is suspected of having ingested buttom cell battery, seek immediate medical assistance.​

    Buttom cell battery may cause serious corrosion damage in bowel.

  • Calcium tablets

    Keywords: Calcium, Calcichew®, Calsorin®, Kalcipos®

    A single dose of calcium tablets is unlikely to cause symptoms. Does not require treatment.

    However, some products may contain sweeteners, which may cause gastrointestinal symptoms.​

  • Candles

    A single dose is considered harmless. Does not require treatment.​

  • Car lock de-icer

    Depending on the ingredients, see Isopropanol or Glycols.​

  • Carbon monoxide

    Keywords: CO, carbon monoxide

    First aid includes breathing fresh air and resting in a semi-sitting position.

    If the patient develops other symptoms (nausea, vomiting, headache or fainting) or if you are unsure about the severity of CO exposure, seek medical assistance.

  • Cetirizine

    Keywords: Alzyr®, Cetimax®, Cetirizin®, Heinix®, Histec®, Zyrtec®​

    Ingesting a few tablets or taking a few gulps of cetirizine mixture is not toxic and does not require specific treatment. If the ingested amount is greater, contact the Poison Information Centre to confirm toxicity.

  • Chalk

    Keywords: Crayons, board chalk, wax pastel

    A single dose is considered harmless. Does not require treatment.​

  • Cigarettes

    Children over the age of 1 year: Ingesting less than one whole cigarette or three cigarette butts does not require treatment. Gastrointestinal symptoms may occur. If the ingested amount is greater, contact the Poison Information Centre.

    Nicotine poses the greatest risk to children under the age of 1. Contact the Poison Information Centre to confirm toxicity.

  • Citric acid

    ​Citric acid itself is not corrosive. If the child has ingested a small gulp, rinse the mouth.

  • Combustion products of plastic

    Polyethylene is one of the most common plastics. A typical thermoplastic, it is used in household items and packaging, for example. When polyethylene melts, it is not considered toxic. In fires, however, the burning plastic produces highly toxic vapours.

  • Contraceptive pills

    A single dose is considered harmless. Does not require treatment.

  • Corrosive substances

    Keywords: sulfuric acid, nitric acid, hydrochloric acid, lye, soda, base

    Orally: Rinse the mouth. If the person develops symptoms such as difficulties in swallowing, increased salivation, vomiting or abdominal pains, seek immediate medical assistance.

    Skin and Eye: Rinse the skin and eyes immediately with water for 30-60 minutes. If pain, photophobia or other symptoms occur in the eye, seek medical assistance.

  • Corticosteroids (cortisone)

    Keywords: Hydrocortisone, Hydrocortison®, Prednisolon®, Prednison®​

    A single dose of cortisone tablets or cream is considered harmless. In large amounts, creams may cause gastrointestinal symptoms. Does not require treatment.

  • Cough medicines

    ​Toxicity depends on the product. Contact the Poison Information Centre to confirm toxicity.​​

  • Crayons, chalk

    A single dose is considered harmless. Does not require treatment.

  • Deodorant

    A single dose is considered harmless. Does not require treatment.

  • Dermatological creams

    Keywords: lotion, moisturising cream

    A single dose is considered harmless. In large amounts, creams may cause gastrointestinal symptoms. Does not require treatment.​

  • Desiccant bags, capsules and grains

    Keywords: Dehydrating agent, Silica gel

    A single dose of desiccant typically found in shoeboxes, electronic device packages and the lids of vitamin supplement and medicine jars is considered harmless. Does not require treatment.​

  • Detergents (corrosive)

    ​Keywords: drain cleaners, toilet cleaners, oven cleaners, hypochlorite compounds, laundry pods, dishwasher detergents

    Detergents with pH under 2 (acid), or over 11, 5 (alkaline) can cause chemical burns.

    Ingestion: Rinse the mouth. If the person develops symptoms such as difficulties in swallowing, increased salivation, vomiting or abdominal pains, seek immediate medical assistance. 

    On the skin or in the eye: Rinse with water for at least 30 to 60 minutes. If severe pain or burns develop, or the skin becomes inflamed, take the patient to the doctor. If symptoms such as severe pain, swelling, sensitivity to light or tearing develop in the eye during the next hours, take the patient to the doctor.

    Inhaled: During household cleaning the exposure is usually temporary, move to fresh air.


  • Detergents (irritating)

    ​Keywords: Fairy, washing-up liquids, dishwasher detergents, laundry detergents, fabric softeners, all-purpose cleaner, toilet freshener

    Detergents with a pH between 2 and 11,5 may cause irritation.

    Ingestion: Detergents contain foaming agents. When accidentally ingested, the dose is typically small. Rinse the mouth and avoid copious drinking to prevent excessive foaming.

    In case of intentional or large amount ingested detergents, seek always medical assistance.

    In the eye: Rinse the eye with plenty of water for about 15 minutes. If symptoms of inflammation (such as severe pain, swelling, sensitivity to light or tearing) develop during the next hours, take the patient to the doctor.

  • Disinfectants

    The contents of disinfectants vary greatly. Contact the Poison Information Centre to confirm toxicity.

  • Electronic cigarette

    ​Even a small amount of e-liquid with nicotine can cause severe poisoning in children. Always contact the Poison Information Centre to confirm toxicity!

  • Epoxy adhesives

    The curing agents used in epoxy adhesives may be corrosive. Contact the Poison Information Centre to confirm toxicity.​

  • EPS (expanded polystyrene)

    EPS (expanded polystyrene) is not toxic, but may cause suffocation if the swallowed pieces are large.​

  • Essential oils

    Keywords: fragrance oils, scented drops, sauna oils, essential oils

    An amount corresponding to one tablespoon of essential oils can be a toxic dose to a child. When assessing toxicity, it is important to determine whether the ingested product is a 100% pure essential oil or a dilution. Contact the Poison Information Centre to confirm toxicity, if necessary.

  • Ethanol

    Keywords: Drinkable alcohol, liquor, cider, beer, wine, perfume, aftershave, toner, Septidin®, Neo-Amisept®, Asept®, local antiseptics, Lasol®, Marinol®, window cleaner

    Even a gulp of ethanol may cause intoxication for children. If the child drinks alcohol or other liquids containing ethanol, contact the Poison Information Centre to confirm toxicity.​​

  • Fertilisers

    The content of fertilisers varies. Contact the Poison Information Centre to confirm toxicity.

  • Finger paint

    A single dose is considered harmless. Does not require treatment.

  • Flower vase water

    The water in a vase is nontoxic.​

  • Foreign bodies

    Keywords: Shots, coins, metal objects, plastic objects

    Swallowed foreign bodies are considered harmless regarding to toxicity. However, they can cause bowel obstruction.

    In case of ingestion, contact your primary healt-care center or other emergency unit for more information.​


  • Glue

    Keywords: paper glue, glue stick

    Water-soluble glues: Glue sticks and paper glues, are considered harmless as a single dose.

    Adhesives (containing solvents)Adhesives that contain solvents may be toxic if inhaled or ingested in large amounts.

    Epoxy adhesives: The curing agents used in epoxy adhesives may be corrosive. Contact the Poison Information Centre to confirm toxicity.​

    Instant adhesives: see Cyanoacrylate adhesives

  • Glycerol

    Keywords: glycerine

    A gulp or two is not considered harmful, although gastrointestinal symptoms may occur. Does not require treatment.​

  • Glycols

    Keywords: coolant, brake fluid, ethylene glycol, propylene glycol

    Propylene glycol: A single dose ingested is considered harmless.

    Ethylene glycol:​ Highly toxic. In case of possible ingestion, seek medical assistance without delay.

  • Hair styling products

    A single dose is considered harmless. Does not require treatment.​

  • Heartburn drugs

    Keywords: Rennie ®, Antepsin ®, Balancid Novum ®, Gaviscon ®, Galieve Peppermint ®, antacids

    A single dose of mentioned drugs is considered harmless. Does not require treatment.​

    In case of other heartburn drug, contact the Poison Information Centre to confirm toxicity.

  • Helium

    Keywords: balloon, foil balloon

    Inhaled in small amounts, helium gas is not considered dangerous. In addition to a high-pitched voice, inhaling helium gas may cause symptoms such as headache and dizziness. These are caused by hypoxia resulting from the helium gas displacing oxygen.

  • Hydrocortisone

    Keywords: Corticosteroids, Hydrocortison®

    A single dose of cortisone tablets or cream is considered harmless. In large amounts, creams may cause gastrointestinal symptoms. Does not require treatment.​

  • Hydrogen peroxide

    Toxicity of hydrogen peroxide depends on the amount and the concentration. Contact the Poison Information Centre to confirm toxicity.

  • Ibuprofen

    Keywords:​ Burana®, Ibumax®, Ibumetin®, Ibusal®, Ibuxin®, painkiller, analgesic

    A single dose not exceeding 100mg per kg of body weight is harmless and does not require treatment. If the ingested amount is over 100mg per kg of body weight, contact the Poison Information Centre to confirm toxicity.

  • Ink

    Pens: Inks used in pens are harmless if the ingested amount is less than 5ml.

    Printers: The content varies. Printer inks may contain for example glycolsisopropanolethanol​. Contact the Poison Information Centre to confirm toxicity.

  • Insect repellents

    Keywords: OFF, insect repellent, hyttysässä

    The content of insect repellents varies. Contact the Poison Information Centre to confirm toxicity.​

  • Instant adhesives

    Keywords: Cyanoacrylate adhesives, superglue

    Orally: It is almost impossible to swallow cyanoacrylate adhesives. The adhesive solidifies and adheres to the inside of the mouth. No special treatment is usually required, because saliva will lift the adhesive in 12 to 48 hours. It is possible to accelerate this by gently brushing the insides of the mouth with a soft toothbrush.

    Skin: Adhesive attached to the skin can be removed by using a brush, warm water and soap. Immerse the glued areas in warm soapy water and peel gently apart. Do not try to rip or tear the skin apart by force.

    Eye: Rinse eyes thoroughly for at least 15 minutes. If the eyelids are stuck, apply a wet gauze patch, for example, over the eyes. Do not try to force the eyes open. If adhesive is attached to the conjunctiva, it will usually dissociate in a couple of hours. Have a physician or eye specialist to check the eyes to ensure there is no damage.

  • Instant adhesives
  • Iron supplements

    Keywords: Maltofer®, Obsidan®, Retafer®​

    A couple of tablets can cause severe poisoning in children. Always contact the Poison Information Centre to confirm toxicity!.

  • Isopropanol

    Even a gulp of isopropanol may cause intoxication for children. If the child drinks liquids containing isopropanol, contact the Poison Information Centre to confirm toxicity.

  • Ketoprofen

    Keywords: Keto®, Ketomex®, Ketorin®, Orudis®, Painkiller

    Ingesting a single ketoprofen tablet intended for adults is neither likely to cause symptoms of poisoning for children nor require special treatment. However, if the ingested amount is more than one tablet, contact the Poison Information Centre to confirm toxicity.

  • Lactobacillus products

    A single dose is considered harmless. Does not require treatment.​

  • Levothyroxine

    Keywords: Thyroxin®​

    When the ingested amount is less than 4mg of levothyroxine (less than 40 tablets containing 0.1mg, or less than 160 tablets containing 25mcg of levothyroxine), symptoms are mild and do not require specific treatment.

    However, if the person develops notable symptoms (temperature rises during the next 24 hours, for example), seek medical assistance.

  • Magnet

    ​Swallowed magnet is considered harmless regarding to toxicity. However, it can cause bowel obstruction like other Foreign bodies.

    In case of ingestion, contact your primary healt-care center or other emergency unit for more information.

    NB! If several magnets or magnet and another metal object are ingested, seek medical assistance without delay. Attraction may cause serious damage in the bowel.

  • Makeup

    Keywords: lipstick, mascara, powder, concealer, foundation cream, rouge, sun powder, eye shadow, eyeliner, eyebrow pencil

    A single dose is considered harmless. Does not require treatment.

  • Matchbox striking surface

    A single dose is considered harmless. Does not require treatment.

  • Matches

    A single dose of less than 20 ingested match end coatings is considered harmless. Does not require treatment.

    Matchbox striking surfaces are considered harmless as a single dose. Does not require treatment.​

  • Mercury in thermometers

    In modern thermometers, mercury has been replaced with a safer alloy. Mercury is only found in old thermometers.

    The mercury used in old thermometers is metallic (elemental) mercury which is not readily absorbed when ingested or through the skin. Treatment is not required.

    Mercury from a broken thermometer vaporises in a couple of days into the room air and is absorbed when the vapour is inhaled. However, the amounts are typically small and not likely to be toxic.

    Deliver the mercury from a broken thermometer in a tightly sealed container to your pharmacy to be disposed of as hazardous waste. Collect the mercury into a dustpan with a broom, for example. Vacuuming is not recommended as it might contribute to the vaporisation of the mercury.

  • Metal objects

    Keywords: foreign bodies​

    ​Swallowed metal objects are considered harmless regarding to toxicity. However, it can cause bowel obstruction like other foreign bodies.

    In case of ingestion, contact your primary healt-care center or other emergency unit for more information.

  • Methanol

    Methanol is a highly toxic substance. Whenever a person is suspected of having ingested methanol, seek immediate medical assistance.​

  • Mosquito plates and coils

    Does not require treatment when ingested in small doses. If ingested in greater amounts, administer activated charcoal.

  • Multivitamins

    Keywords: Vitamins, Berocca ®

    Multivitamins contain water-soluble and fat-soluble vitamins varying amounts. In addition, some products may contain iron, zinc and other minerals.

    If several tablets have been ingested, contact the Poison Information Centre to confirm toxicity.​

  • Nail polish

    Nail polish is not easy to swallow and the bottles tend to be small. Therefore, the risk of ingesting toxic doses of nail polish is small.

    Other nail care products may contain harmful substances.

    Contact the Poison Information Centre to confirm toxicity.

  • Naproxen

    Keywords: Miranax®, Naprometin®

    1-2 tablets intended for adults or a few gulps of naproxen mixture are unlikely to cause symptoms of poisoning in small children.

    Abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, fatigue and restlessness are common symptoms of naproxen overdose.

    If the ingested amount is greater, contact the Poison Information Centre to confirm toxicity.

  • Nicotine products

    Keywords: Nicotinell®, Nicorette®, Nicotine gum

    Children: If 2mg nicotine gum or 1 mg lozenge or any nicotine patches are ingested, administer activated carbon.

    If there are no symptoms or only gastrointestinal symptoms, monitor the child at home. If the ingested amount is greater or the child develops severe gastrointestinal or CNS symptoms, seek medical assistance.

  • Nitro®

    Keywords: Glyceryl trinitrate, Nitroglycerin ®

    Swallowing less than three sublingual 0.5mg nitroglycerin tablets is not likely to cause symptoms that require special treatment. When swallowed, nitroglycerin tablets lose much of their potency. If the tablets were chewed or sucked like candy, the risk is greater. In such cases, contact the Poison Information Centre to confirm toxicity.​

  • Oftan Akvakol® eye drops

    A 5mg/ml eye drop solution accidentally administered orally is harmless, when the dose is less than 10ml. Does not require treatment.

  • Paint, varnish

    Water-soluble paint or varnish (emulsion paint, for example) is considered harmless as a single dose.

    Solvent-based paints may contain Petroleum products

  • Paper

    A single dose is considered harmless. Does not require treatment.​

  • Paracetamol

    Keywords: Pamol®, Pamol F®, Paramax®, Para-Suppo®, Para-Tabs®, Pinex®​

    A couple of 500mg pills for adults can cause severe poisoning in small children.

    Contact the Poison Information Centre to confirm toxicity.

  • Pencils and dyes

    Keywords: pencil, colored pencils, marker, felt tip pens, watercolor, fingerpaint, face paint

    A single dose is considered harmless. Does not require treatment.

  • Petroleum products (e.g. gasoline)

    Keywords: gasoline, gas, petrol, diesel, lighting fluids, white spirit, lamp oil, mineral turpentine, lighter fluids)

    Orally: If the swallowed amount is small, the child can be monitored at home. If the child develops a cough, vomits, fever or his/her breathing becomes shallow, seek medical assistance.

    An adult who has ingested petroleum products on purpose or by accident should contact the Poison Information Centre or a physician to receive further advice.

    Inhaled: If inhaled, first aid includes breathing fresh air and resting in a semi-sitting position. If the child has other symptoms (is dazed or limp), seek medical assistance without delay.

    NB! Have the container or a photo of the label to confirm the content when contacting the Poison Information Centre or healt-care professionals.

  • Pinex®
  • Plastic

    Orally: Plastic is not toxic when ingested, but may cause suffocation if the swallowed pieces are large.​

    Inhaled: In fires, the burning plastic produces highly toxic vapours.

    Melted plastic: Polyethylene is one of the most common plastics. A typical thermoplastic, it is used in household items and packaging, for example. When polyethylene melts, it is not considered toxic.

  • Rat poison

    In small children, ingesting even a small amount of rat poison is sufficient to cause symptoms. Contact the Poison Information Centre to confirm toxicity.​

  • Remo-Wax® ear drops

    In small doses, ear drops accidentally administered orally are harmless and do not require special treatment.​

  • Salbutamol

    Salbutamol 0.4mg/ml is harmless, when the dose is less than 10ml. Does not require treatment.

    Typical side effects and symptoms of salbutamol poisoning include e.g. flushed skin, tremors and gastrointestinal symptoms.

    If the ingested amount is over 10ml, contact the Poison Information Centre to confirm toxicity.

  • Salt

    If a child has ingested less than half teaspoon of salt, offer him/her something to drink and monitor his/her condition. If the ingested amount is greater or the child develops symptoms, seek medical assistance.​​

  • Shoe care products

    Shoe dyes and polishes may contain dangerous solvents. Shoe polishes contains petroleum products, but in solid form, they can be considered relatively harmless.​

  • Silica gel (desiccant)

    A single dose is considered harmless. Does not require treatment.​

  • Sleeping pills

    An extremely hazardous group. Always contact the Poison Information Centre to confirm toxicity!​

  • Snus
    Even a small amount may cause symptoms in a child. Contact the Poison Information Centre to confirm toxicity.​
  • Soap

    Keywords: Shampoo, hand soap, shower gel

    When accidentally ingested, the dose is typically small. No treatment is required. Rinse the mouth. Avoid copious drinking because of excessive foaming. 

  • Soda

    Keywords: Corrosive substances

    Baking soda (sodium bicarbonite). Does not require treatment when ingested in small amounts (one teaspoon).​ If the ingested amount is greater, contact the Poison Information Centre to confirm toxicity.​

    Washing soda (sodium carbonite) is corrosive substance. It is used for example in paint removals.​

  • Sodium fluoride

    Keywords: Fludent®, Xerodent®

    Doses of less than 20 fluoride tablets per kg of body weight (0.25mg tablets) are considered harmless. Sufficient treatment includes not taking fluoride tablets for a period of time corresponding to the recommended daily dose and the actual ingested amount. The products contain sweeteners, which may cause gastrointestinal symptoms, such as diarrhoea.

    If the ingested amount is more than 20 tablets per kg of body weight, contact the Poison Information Centre to confirm toxicity.

  • Soil

    A single dose is considered harmless. Does not require treatment.​

  • Styrofoam

    ​Styrofoam is not toxic when ingested, but may cause suffocation if the swallowed pieces are large.​

  • Table salt

    If a child has ingested less than half teaspoon of salt, offer him/her something to drink and monitor his/her condition. If the ingested amount is greater or the child develops symptoms, seek medical assistance.​

  • Talc

    A single dose of ingested talcum powder is considered harmless.

  • Thermometers

    The coloured liquids used in thermometers are solvents. The amount of solvent in a thermometer is so small that treatment is not required.

  • Toothpaste

    With fluoridine: The amount of fluoridine varies between toothpastes. Contact the Poison Information Centre to confirm toxicity.

    Without fluoridine: A single dose is considered harmless

  • Toothpaste (without fluoride)

    A single dose is considered harmless.​

  • Turpentine, white spirit

    Keywords: genuine turpentine, mineral turpentine, petroleum products

    Mineral turpentine: Household turpentine or white spirit is usually mineral turpentine. See: Petroleum products.

    Genuine wood turpentine often used by artists is more toxic than mineral turpentine (white spirit). If the ingested amount is known to be small, monitor the child at home. However, if the child develops symptoms such as disorientation, coughing, vomiting or shallow breathing, seek medical assistance without delay.

  • Vicks VapoRub®

    Even a small amount can cause poisoning in children. Contact the Poison Information Centre to confirm toxicity.​

  • Vinegar

    Keywords: household vinegar, wine vinegar, white vinegar​

    Standard household vinegar can be mildly irritating to children. If ingested, dilute the vinegar by offering a small amount of water or milk to the child.

    Vinegar/acetic acid exceeding 10 per cent is highly irritating or corrosive

  • Vitamins

    Keywords: Vitamin A, Vitamin B, Vitamin C, Vitamin D, Vitamin E, Vitamin K

    Water-soluble vitamins (Vitamins B and C) are considered harmless as a single dose. Does not require treatment.

    Fat-soluble vitamins (Vitamins A, D, E and K) are considered harmless as a single dose. Overdosed product should pause for as many days as extra dose have been taken.

    Most vitamin products contain sweeteners (e.g. xylitol and sorbitol) that can cause gastrointestinal symptoms in large amounts.

    In case of long-term (repeatedly) overdose, contact the Poison Information Centre to confirm toxicity.

  • Wart removal products

    If ingested, wart removal products may cause corrosive damage. Rinse the mouth. See: Corrosive substances

  • Watercolours

    A single dose is considered harmless. Does not require treatment.​

  • White spirit
  • Window cleaners

    Window cleaners may contain ethanol, isopropanol and Detergents (irritating)​

  • Windscreen cleaners

    Windscreen cleaners may contain ethanol, isopropanol and/or methanol.

  • Xylometazoline

    Keywords: Nasolin®, Naso-Ratiopharm®, Otrivin®

    A child: If the ingested amount is less than 4ml (concentration 1 mg/ml), monitor the child at home for approximately two hours. If the child develops notable symptoms, seek medical assistance. If the ingested amount exceeds 4 ml, contact the Poison Information Centre.

    An adultThe toxic dose is not known in adults. If the ingested amount is great or the person develops symptoms, contact the Poison Information Centre.

 

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